Unpaid work and access to science professions

Unpaid work in the sciences is advocated as an entry route into scientific careers. We compared the success of UK science graduates who took paid or unpaid work six-months after graduation in obtaining a high salary or working in a STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Mathematics) field 3.5 yea...

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Bibliographic details
Volume: 14
Main Author: Fournier, Auriel M. V
Holford, Angus J
Bond, Alexander L
Leighton, Margaret A
Format: Journal Article
Language: English
Zielgruppe: Academic
Place of publication: SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE 19.06.2019
Public Library of Science
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
published in: PloS one Vol. 14; no. 6; p. e0217032
Editor: Rosenbloom, Joshua L
ORCID: 0000-0003-3270-1269
0000-0002-8530-9968
0000-0003-2019-4845
Data of publication: 2019-06-19
ISSN: 1932-6203
1932-6203
EISSN: 1932-6203
Alternate Title: Unpaid work and access to science professions
Discipline: Sciences (General)
Bibliography: Current address: Forbes Biological Station–Bellrose Waterfowl Research Center, Illinois Natural History Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Havana, Illinois, United States of America
Competing Interests: The authors of this study have read the journal's policy and have the following competing interests: Bond is a paid employee of Ardenna Research. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. There are no patents, products in development, or market products to declare. Holford, Fournier and Leighton declare that they have no competing interests.
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Online Access: Fulltext
Database: Social Sciences Citation Index
Web of Science - Science Citation Index Expanded - 2019
Web of Knowledge
Science Citation Index Expanded
Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019
Web of Science
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MEDLINE - Academic
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